Men's Basketball

 
Dave Dickerson

Hometown:
Olar, S.C.

Position:
Head Coach

Experience:
5th Season

Alma Mater:
Maryland, 1990

Dave Dickerson





  • Dave Dickerson became the 22nd head coach in Tulane men's basketball history.

  • Turned a rebuilding fourth season into a strong finish with an eighth-place showing in Conference USA play and a 14-17 overall record. Tulane won four of its final six games with both losses coming to nationally ranked Memphis in the regular season finale and in the Conference USA Tournament quarterfinal round. Off the court, Tulane basketball once again placed high in the NCAA's annual Annual Performance Rate, finishing in the 80-90 percentile.

  • Led Tulane to a 17-15 record in his third year, marking the first time in over 10 years that the Green Wave has recorded back-to-back winning seasons. Season highlights included a 10-4 non-conference record with a 3-0 mark against Southeastern Conference teams, 10 victories inside the city of New Orleans, including an impressive victory over in-state rival LSU, and TU improved to 3-0 under third-year head coach Dave Dickerson in Conference USA Tournament opening round games.

  • In his second season, Dickerson led Tulane to a 17-13 overall record, the most wins since 1999-2000, and to a 9-7 Conference USA, which was good enough for fourth-place finish. TU's league finish marked the program's most conference wins since 1996-97. The finish also earned the Green Wave a first round bye in the conference tournament for the first time since 2000.

  • Tulane surpassed expectations and was one of the hottest in the conference, winning eight of its final 10 games en route to the Conference USA Tournament semifinals.

  • During his first season as a collegiate head coach, he led Tulane to a 12-17 overall record, a sixth-place finish in Conference USA play (the team was picked to finish last in the preseason coaches poll) and to the quarterfinals of the C-USA Tournament with a first round win over Marshall.

  • Came to the Green Wave after nine years as an assistant at Maryland under Gary Williams. In 2004-05, he was the program's associate head coach.

  • Helped the Terrapins to nine straight postseason appearances, five Sweet Sixteens, two Final Fours and one National Championship. In 15 years as an assistant coach, he never saw a losing season while making 10 postseason appearances.

  • Maryland's record during Dickerson's tenure was 212-88 (.707).

  • Helped direct Maryland to the 2002 NCAA National Championship (32-4 record).

  • Following Maryland's first trip to the Final Four during the 2000-01 postseason, Dickerson was elevated on Gary Williams' staff to take the lead in the Terrapins' recruiting and scouting efforts.

  • Accolades for Dickerson have included his recognition as an AFLAC Assistant Coach of the Year in 2003, the ACC's No. 1 Assistant Coach as named by Basketball News (2003-04), Athlon Sports' No. 4 Assistant Coach in the nation (2003-04), and an "Assistant Coach on the Rise" as tabbed by ESPN's Andy Katz (2003-04).

  • During his nine seasons at his alma mater, five of Maryland's recruiting classes have been ranked among the nation's best.

  • Helped Maryland to attract a 2002-03 incoming class of five top 100 recruits, including National High School Coaches Association player of the year Nik Caner-Medley.

  • Also scouted and recruited All-America guard Steve Francis, who was the No. 2 overall selection in the 1999 NBA Draft.

  • The 2002 draft saw three Dickerson recruits - Chris Wilcox, Final Four Most Outstanding Player Juan Dixon and two-time NCAA Regional MVP Lonny Baxter - become selections in the first two rounds of the NBA Draft. Steve Blake, who ranks fifth all-time in assists in NCAA history, was an NBA Draft pick in 2003.

  • Prior to coming to Maryland, Dickerson was an assistant coach at Radford University, Gardner-Webb and James Madison.

  • Dickerson played forward at Maryland from 1986-89 and earned four varsity letters. He was co-captain as a senior in 1989. Dickerson saw action in the 1986 and 1988 NCAA Tournaments and was a member of three teams that advanced to the ACC Tournament semifinals.

  • In 1990, Dickerson earned his bachelor's degree in government and politics from Maryland. After a year at Gardner Webb he joined former Maryland head coach Lefty Driesell at James Madison for a 1992 season that culminated in a bid to the NIT.

  • A native of Olar, S.C., Dickerson is married to the former Laurette Newsom, a 1991 graduate of Maryland. The couple has one child, Dave III (8).


  • The mastermind behind the resurgence of the Tulane men's basketball program, head coach Dave Dickerson begins his fifth season as the head coach on the Uptown campus in 2009-10. Dickerson has an overall record of 60-62 and a Conference USA mark of 28-34.

    Dickerson has taken Green Wave basketball from a program that registered just one winning season during the five years prior to his arrival and overhauled the squad into a conference contender by his second season. Dickerson guided the Wave to back-to-back winning seasons in 2006-07 and 2007-08, a feat not accomplished since the days of Perry Clark 11 years earlier.

    Along with the improvements during the regular season, Dickerson has opened the door to postseason success in the Conference USA Tournament where the Green Wave is 4-0 in opening round games.

    With the Wave's recent success on the court and the team's performance in the classroom, Dickerson takes great pride in his 100 percent graduation rate by Tulane seniors under his watch.

    The 2008-09 campaign turned into a rebuilding season for much of the opening half of the season, but the Green Wave finished strong with an eighth-place showing in Conference USA play. Off the court, Tulane basketball once again placed high in the NCAA's annual Annual Performance Rate, finishing in the 80-90 percentile.

    Dickerson has taken the Green Wave basketball from a program that enjoyed just one winning season during the five years prior to his arrival and overhauled the squad into a conference contender by his second season. Last season, Dickerson guided the Wave to back-to-back winning seasons for the first time since the 1995-96 and 1996-97 campaigns, or a span of 11 years, and Tulane once again found success in the Conference USA Tournament.

    Season highlights included a 10-4 non-conference record with a 3-0 mark against Southeastern Conference teams, including wins over SEC Tournament Champion Georgia, Auburn and LSU, 10 victories inside the city of New Orleans, including an impressive victory over in-state rival LSU, and TU improved to 3-0 under Dickerson in Conference USA Tournament opening round games with its victory over Marshall in the first round of the 2008 C-USA Tourney.

    Tulane's success did not go unnoticed in the coaching circles as Dickerson was tabbed as the National Association of Basketball Coaches All-District 8 Coach of the Year, and was the lone coach from Conference USA to receive the national award.

    Off the court, the Green Wave was recognized in the NCAA's annual Academic Performance Rates as one of the NCAA's top 10 percent basketball squads, and was just one of 33 school's from around the nation that were singled out for its elite success.

    However, Tulane's success under Dickerson has not come easy or been the norm of most rebuilding jobs. Dickerson has been forced to take the road less traveled for most coaches, but still managed to mold the Green Wave into a winning program. He had to withstand the ordeal brought on by Hurricane Katrina during his first season and the distractions of the rebuilding process both in New Orleans and on the Tulane campus during his second campaign.

    "Has any coach in America had it tougher than Dave Dickerson? He not only had to rebuild a struggling Tulane program, but he had to do it in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. It is hard not to root for Tulane. And it's easy to recognize that Dickerson is one of the most courageous coaches in the country for the burden he has shouldered," said ESPN's Jay Bilas.

    After Tulane's 17-win campaign and fourth-place finish in 2006-07, one ESPN analyst stated that "Given everything he's had to deal with, Dave Dickerson should be coach of the year."

    Along with the 46 victories and three straight opening round victories in the Conference USA Tournament during his first three years, Dickerson has helped three players earn All C-USA recognition, including Quincy Davis (third team), David Gomez (second team/third team), Kevin Sims (all-freshman team) and Chris Moore, who was a two-time C-USA Player of the Week honoree.

    Dickerson has shaped the Green Wave into a stingy team on its home court and city. Tulane has a record of 27-13 (.680) at Fogelman Arena and a mark of 17-5 (.772) against non-conference teams in New Orleans.

    During his second season, Tulane was once again picked to finish close to the bottom of the Conference USA race, but Dickerson and the Green Wave proved the league wrong with a 17-13 overall record and TU recorded its best conference finish in nine years with a 9-7 league mark, which was good enough for fourth place. Dickerson led the Green Wave to its most wins in seven seasons and the program's first winning season in four years.

    Tulane was tough to beat at Fogelman Arena with an 11-4 mark and concluded the year riding a four-game win streak on its home floor.

    Dickerson's 29 wins in his first two seasons put him in third place for the most wins by a Tulane coach in the first two seasons.

    During his first season at the helm of the Green Wave basketball program, Dickerson was faced with perhaps a challenge no other first-year basketball coach in NCAA history has ever had to overcome. On August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina made landfall south of New Orleans and the effects of the storm devastated the city as levees broke and flooded a majority of the city.

    The Green Wave settled in College Station, Texas, home of Texas A&M University, and Dickerson, along with his players and staff, began their first campaign together.

    Despite the challenges, Dickerson led Tulane to a 12-17 overall record and a 6-8 Conference USA mark, which tied the Wave for sixth place. The Green Wave continued to jell late in the season, winning seven of its final 12 games, including a 64-58 first round victory over Marshall in the Conference USA Tournament. TU dropped a hard-fought decision to eventual champion and NCAA "Elite Eight" team, Memphis, on its home floor in the C-USA Tourney quarterfinals.

    Dickerson came to Tulane from his alma mater of Maryland, where he spent nine years as an assistant under Gary Williams. In 2004-05, he was the program's associate head coach. He helped the Terrapins to nine straight postseason appearances, five Sweet Sixteens, two Final Fours and one National Championship in 2002.

    Accolades for Dickerson have included his recognition as an AFLAC Assistant Coach of the Year in 2003, the ACC's No. 1 Assistant Coach as named by Basketball News (2003-04), Athlon Sports' No. 4 Assistant Coach in the nation (2003-04), and an "Assistant Coach on the Rise" as tabbed by ESPN's Andy Katz.

    After six straight winning seasons as an assistant coach at three schools, Dickerson was tabbed by Gary Williams to return to his alma mater as an assistant. Williams had built a foundation for success with the Terrapins in his first seven years as the head coach, but with Dickerson at his side, Maryland enjoyed an unprecedented run. In their nine years together, the Terrapins made nine postseason appearances, posted eight 20-win seasons, advanced to two Final Fours and won the first National Championship in program history in 2002.

    "Winning the national championship at Maryland was a dream-come-true," Dickerson said. "It validated the reason I went to Maryland as a student-athlete. I thought we were the type of school that could get into a position to win a national championship. One of my goals after winning the championship as an assistant coach was to try and be a head coach and chase that dream again."

    With his impressive run as an assistant coach, his strong family background and his reputation as one of the hardest-working coaches in the business, Dickerson was an easy choice for Tulane Athletic Director Rick Dickson as the man to take charge of the Green Wave basketball program.

    Soon, Dickerson recognized that Tulane matched his personality and requirements as well.

    "The first thing that attracted me to Tulane was the opportunity to be a head coach at one of the best schools in the country with a national reputation for its academics and the potential to be a nationally-recognized basketball program," Dickerson said. "As I did more research, I could see that it was also an opportunity to come into a program and make a difference by winning basketball games, which has always been the type of situation I saw myself going into."

    Upon settling into New Orleans and Tulane, Dickerson quickly embraced his new family - the Tulane basketball players. As a collegiate player, he had experienced a coaching change and knew the stress and confusion it could cause. He set up individual meetings with all of the returning players and his first road trips were to the homes of the two players who had signed letters of intent to play for the Green Wave.

    From there, Dickerson's goal was to change the atmosphere and attitude surrounding the program.

    Dickerson, facing what was likely to be among the most trying first years for a head coach in history, responded with strength and determination, drawing on his own experiences as a player at Maryland to guide the Green Wave players through the challenges. Following Dickerson's freshman year at Maryland, that program experienced a tragedy when All-American Len Bias suffered a drug-related death shortly after being selected No. 2 in the 1986 NBA Draft. Dickerson, who had served as Bias' backup, saw the Maryland program thrown into disarray.

    "I learned so much from everything that happened to our program when I was a player at Maryland," Dickerson said. "You can approach adversity in two ways, you can shrink from it and hide, or you can meet it head-on and learn from it. As much as I wish that none of that happened, I learned from it, I grew up much quicker than I would have otherwise. Seeing how things were handled at the time, both positively and negatively, made me realize that I wanted to be a basketball coach."

    Dickerson's long-term goals for his men's basketball program are consistent with the same values Tulane holds as a university.

    "My long-range goal for the program is for us to be as good as the school," Dickerson said. "If we are a top 30 school in the country, then my goal is for us to be a top 30 basketball program. If we can be at that level, then we will be competing for postseason play every year. My top priority is to make sure that our players have a great experience, both on and off the court, in and out of the classroom, and that they are better people from being at Tulane. I want the Tulane experience to be one of the best experiences of their lives."

    As his teams come together as a family each season, Dickerson is clearly the mentor and role model for his "kids." Winning basketball games is a goal for every coach, but Dickerson also focuses on developing his players into responsible young men with the tools necessary to succeed in life, whether on or off the basketball court.

    "The guys that come through a college basketball program are not all going to be professional basketball players," Dickerson said. "Our guys can look at me and see that going to college and getting a degree can do something for you. You don't have to be a pro basketball player; you don't have to be a great basketball player in college to be successful. I hope I can rub off on them. I am a true student-athlete. I used basketball to get a scholarship and I used basketball to be successful in life. That is what 90 percent of our basketball players at Tulane have to do, use basketball to earn a Tulane education which will allow them to be successful in life."

    Dickerson wants each and every Tulane basketball player to know that they will always have the support of their Green Wave family to help them achieve success, just as Dickerson has relied upon his original family of his parents and sisters, his number one family of his wife and son, and his basketball families at Maryland and now Tulane.

    Growing up in a small town in South Carolina, Dickerson did not have to look far for positive role models. When his mother passed when he was eight years old, his father and his older sisters provided the drive for his success.

    "I have six older sisters and they are all very, very successful in different ways, so I had instant role models because they were the people I wanted to be like and they demanded that I be successful," Dickerson said. "There was pressure from them just to go to college, not to play basketball, but just to go to college.

    "My father was also a role model for me. He worked every day for 35 years, never complained and the most he ever made was $15,000. I never knew I was poor, because we had stability and discipline within the family, and everyone in my family knew they had to do something with their lives."

    With that support, Dickerson grew into a standout high school basketball player before making his first big move - to the University of Maryland, where he was a standout basketball player. In 1988-89, he was selected a team captain for the Terrapins, a tribute to his leadership skills. From there, coaching was the obvious next step.

    "I knew in the back of my mind that playing basketball was not going to be a career for me, so I started looking at different things," Dickerson said. "I was the type of student-athlete that always wanted to give back; I was always a leader. Even though I had a tough career at Maryland with a lot adversity, my coaches were always the people that kept me going in the right direction. I wanted to be like them. So coaching was my destiny."

    A native of Olar, S.C., Dickerson is married to the former Laurette Newsom, a 1991 graduate of Maryland. The couple has one child, Dave III (8).

    Dickerson File
    Dickerson's Coaching Experience

    2005-PTulane University, Head Coach
    2004-2005University of Maryland, Associate Head Coach
    1996-2004University of Maryland, Assistant Coach
    1992-96Radford University, Assistant Coach
    1991-92James Madison University, Assistant Coach
    1990-91Gardner Webb College, Assistant Coach

    Dickerson's Year-By-Year as a Head Coach

    YearSchoolRecordTeam Accomplishments
    2005-06Tulane12-17C-USA Tournament Quarterfinals
    2006-07Tulane17-13C-USA Tournament Semifinals
    2007-08Tulane17-15C-USA Tournament Quarterfinals
    2008-09Tulane14-17C-USA Tournament Quarterfinals

    Dickerson's Year-By-Year as an Associate/Assistant Coach

    YearSchoolRecordTeam Accomplishments
    2004-05Maryland19-13NIT Semifinals
    2003-04Maryland20-12NCAA Phoenix Region Second Round - ACC Tournament Champions
    2002-03Maryland21-10NCAA South Region Semifinals
    2001-02Maryland32-4NCAA Champions - ACC Regular Season Champions
    2000-01Maryland25-11NCAA Final Four, West Region Champions
    1999-00Maryland25-10NCAA Midwest Region Second Round
    1998-99Maryland28-6NCAA South Region Semifinals
    1997-98Maryland21-11NCAA West Region Semifinals
    1996-97Maryland 21-11NCAA Southeast Region First Round
    1995-96Radford14-13Big South Tournament
    1994-95Radford16-12Big South Tournament, Semifinals
    1993-94Radford20-8Big South Tournament, Semifinals
    1992-93Radford16-15Big South Tournament, Semifinals
    1991-92James Madison21-11Colonial Athletic Association Finals - NIT 1st Round
    1990-91Gardner Webb15-14South Atlantic Conference Tournament Finals

    Playing Experience
    1985-89, University of Maryland, basketball letterwinner

    Playing Honors
    Maryland team captain, 1989
    Career Contribution Award, 1989
    Most Improved Player Award, 1987

    Personal
    Education: University of Maryland, 1990, B.A. in government and politics
    Date of Birth: March 29, 1967
    Family: Wife Laurette, son Dave III (8)

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